Is the Government’s 10 Point Plan enough?


Unsurprisingly, it isn’t just myself and Friends of the Earth that are thinking that the government’s climate plan might not be quite ambitious enough. By – Nala Rollo – Joint Co-ordinator of Climate Action Chester & District.

Most who have read it are in the same boat.

They’ve written their own 10 point plan which you can compare to the government’s HERE.

The Financial Times said “The government estimates the plan will save more than 180m tonnes of CO2 emissions during the 2023 to 2032 period, which is slightly more than half the UK’s annual emissions right now.”

This breakdown was not published until a full day after journalists and the media were given the official announcement, so it’s not a surprise to find it didn’t find its way into much of the coverage.

BBC News pointed out “new money announced in the package is a twenty fifth of the projected £100bn cost of high-speed rail, HS2”.

New Scientist stated “the plan’s most obvious shortcoming is money”.
Even the right leaning Telegraph said the plans are “dwarfed by figures pledged in other major European nations”.

There’s huge omissions in the plan too.

They have promised a strategy to protect peat without laws put in place to do so and without enough funding compared to what is needed.

My partner, who works for an agricultural bank, was telling me last night that farmers have been left with little to no information about post-Brexit subsidies.

Jet zero, as the government like to refer to it, (zero emissions from long haul planes) are over twenty years away, yet there’s no mention of The Citizens’ Assembly’s recommended frequent fliers tax.

There’s masses of confusion when it comes to the twenty seven billion pound roads programme’s emission calculations but general consensus is it will actually increase emissions and also encourages car dependence.

The government are even talking about bringing back the production of coal! Why any sensible government would look to do this is beyond me.

Most of what is in the plan has already been announced previously including the tree planting and offshore wind energy elements.

You can reach your own conclusions as to whether the government are meeting their targets already set.

Personally, I don’t think that they are.

I eagerly await advisers at the Climate Change Committee (CCC) releasing their recommendations for the sixth carbon budget on 9th December and the forthcoming energy white paper with baited breath.

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